9.23.16

It has been a month since I visited the blog. In that time, I have been working on dejunkifying which is a project begun many many months ago. AwaySon came to visit from Chicago and has been instrumental in getting the basement under control. 
In our first trip to the transfer station, we unloaded 300 pounds of unsale-ables and 100 pounds of paper. As soon as we came home, I was looking around to load up and do it again! It is very freeing.

There will be a mammoth ESTATE SALE coming up around October 20. Let me know if you are interested in tools, camping, antiques, fabric, yarn, handmade dolls, American Girl doll and accessories, household sundries, small power tools.

8.22.16

ELIZABETH BARTON is doing a TRUNK SHOW at one of my guilds tomorrow! 

This is City in Winter, one of my favorites by Elizabeth Barton.














Interesting machine quilting. The faced binding gives it that painterly edge to edge look.


Cape Cornwall, by Elizabeth Barton, had me going back to it several times when I saw it at the Blue Ridge Center for the Arts Fiber Arts Show in June.

I kept going up to see the details close up.

She used hand and machine quilting, raw-edge applique, and what I believe to be a dying technique where color is removed from fabric.



I am looking forward to seeing some of her work again, in person.

8.19.16

Excellent ground cover is not an easy thing to remove from gravel. 

I don't know what this weed is, but I spend about a half-hour every morning, working my way around the driveway. 

 

It is sticky and the rocks are rough to brush away, so I wear gloves. 

I can do about five feet, then it is too hot and the bees have woken up. 


 Issues with my elbow have slowed down my hand-sewing considerably. I've been able to get some machine piecing done and I'm caught up in Temecula. 

I've decided to discontinue Splendid Sampler, ending with block #49. When I first started it, it was exciting to find each block and choose the fabrics, work it, and see the results.

Then, it became something to tick off on a list as COMPLETE. Eventually, the blocks got really weird. You've heard me say how I believed some of the designers were trying to show off or make something that no one could duplicate. Some of the juvenile embroidery was not to my taste, either. 






In a way, I'm sorry I am not continuing. When the only pleasure came from marking off each block as I finished it and some of the blocks took eight or nine hours to make (FOR A 6" block!), I was not getting the right fun to effort quotient. 





So, cut bait.

8.16.16

Undeniably, Elizabeth Barton is one of our area's most talented fiber artists. 

This is LEGACY, which I photographed at a recent fiber arts show at the Blue Ridge Center for the Arts. 

For many, quilt making is an exercise--exploring or learning a technique and displaying "homework", if you will. 



For some, it is the skilled copying of another's design that the maker wants to keep for him/herself. 

But for others, each piece has meaning and message. That's the kind of quilt artist Elizabeth Barton is.

8.15.16

I have worms. Fall webworms, to be exact. 

Some are up too high for me to reach. 

These webby pouches are filled with caterpillars. 

Some of the recommended treatments offered by state extension offices include torching, insecticide (SEVIN), pulling them down and hoping birds will eat the caterpillars. 

I called my tree surgeon, and like surgeons world-wide, his suggestion was to CUT. As in CUT THE TREES DOWN

I decided to get an estimate for having the branches removed and Saturday I will have that estimate. In the meantime, if you know of someone with a cherry picker who has a saw blade on a 10-foot pole and wants an afternoon's entertainment, give them my number.

8.13.16

My philosophy has been that too much introspection gets you nowhere but deeper into the vortex. 

I subscribe to the theory that to focus OUT helps one engage in the world. But, while I was at Powell's City of Books, in Portland, I found a book that has me re-evaluating this way of thinking.

I had just that week discovered some things about myself that were truly revelatory. Those discoveries are what set me on the search for something in the Buddhist aisle at Powell's.

I am VERY good at identifying a problem. I am not so good at problem solving. My standard method is to look around for a delegate and instruct that delegate regarding the outcome I expect. Since I have had so much success with this method, my problem solving muscles have not had much exercise. 

How to See Yourself as You Really Are is proving to be a difficult read. I am reading each paragraph two to three times before going on to the next. I know I will have to reread the whole book when I finally finish. Right now, I'm at the part about the inter-relatedness of objects to their parts, and objects and their surroundings. Somehow, this has helped me identify some problem solving strategies. From FIX IT, PLEASE, I WANT IT TO WORK LIKE THIS, I am beginning to think WHAT CAN I DO TO GET TO POINT B?


8.14.16

My Pieceful Mountain Guild Sister, Linda Daughtry, is one of my favorite artists. 

This piece is called TSA, for reasons travelers like me can easily recognize.

She used a color discharge technique to make the figures and other golden tones. 

I wish I had thought to take close ups of the written segments. Of course, the golds and oranges and buttons distracted me. Love buttons, love yellow and bronzy, coppery, orange.

I say "travelers like me", because, I am a frequent visitor to Oregon. I just returned from a short visit, where I looked for a place to live. In fact, I am looking to retire from retirement. I saw some promising areas.

I will miss my trees. Every window opens to oaks, pines, poplars, and my favorite, maples. Trees give me solitude and help center me. There are some mighty trees in the Northwest, and I spent time every day with them. Their look is different, but their presence brings me peace. 

7.19.16

This is my favorite kind of morning. Cool, foggy, and full of secrets. 

Scientifically, I know that the density of the fog makes the birdsong muffled, but I like the idea that the morning has secrets for me to discover.








Splendid Sampler block #45 is called Sewing Nut and is designed by Frances Newcombe
It's that cutesy style like the embroidery of block #44, kind of a child-like Japanese style. I admire the design talent, but it is not my favorite to execute. 

Something that takes this long to complete should be more pleasing to my personal aesthetic. You can see I exchanged the applique tree and leaves in favor of a quick outline stitch. 

Anyway, I am taking pleasure in completing each block and learning new techniques.

7.16.16

Finished my PULSE quilt top. It will be sent to the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild along with another quilt that was made by members of my modern guild, Southern Appalachian Modern Quilt Guild. 

I will show you that quilt when I get a picture of it in August, when it comes back from the quilter.


Splendid Block #43 is by Pat Sloan and is called Pincushion Love. It is entirely appropriate that the pins are bent, just like my real pins.
You can barely tell, but the background is a very dark blue with red tattersall weave.




Splendid Block # 44 is called Stitch in the Garden by Gail Pan. I am amazed at how little I care to do embroidery of this style. I thought I really liked it. I guess appreciating someone's work and enjoying duplicating it do not necessarily follow.
Last week's Temecula Circa 2016, July 9 is a Friendship Star block.












Here is this week's: Yankee Puzzle














Second Saturday for July (Amish With a Twist from Bless My Stitches Quilt Shop)










I got a little behind with my June Gypsy block from Quilt Shop on Main, but here it is. July will be late, as well!


7.12.16

Mystery solved! HusbandofQuiltyFriend, half of a gardening duo, identified my plant as a Paulownia Tree. 

It goes by several names, such as Princess Tree or Empress Tree. 

It is cousin to the Snapdragon and Butterfly Bush.

Since mine is growing under the overhang of my roof, it must be transplanted and soon.

Someone's full-grown Paulownia


It will grow to be 20 feet or more. 

Ironically, it dislikes clay and rocky soil. 

I have a feeling transplanting it is going to cause it some distress since clay and rocky soil is what I grow best in my yard.

Blossoms up close

Blossoms that Marcelo Garcia liked
Did another Splendid Block. This is #42, Pencils by Jane Davidson. I enjoyed making it.

7.3.16

My gladioli are blooming one at a time. Since they are not making a big show in the garden, I am cutting them and enjoying them in the house, stalk by stalk. I like this photo. It reminds me of Georgia O'Keeffe.



Splendid Sampler Block #40, designed by Barb Groves and Mary Jacobson, is called Flights of Friendship.










Splendid Sampler Block # 41, Sew South, designed by Jennifer Mathis.


Temecula circa 2016, July 1 block, is called Shoofly.

This is the most recent block sewn, I was concentrating better and enjoyed this one.


 Amish with a Twist. I assure you there are WAAAAAAY more seams that were sewn than it looks. My concentration was off, and so was my sewing.







Southern Appalachian Modern Quilt Guild Block of the month: Applique'. Mine is 5.5" by 9.5", half sized. My concentration has been wandering. I need to get some good streaming shows that take up most of my mind so my applique' is more even in temperament.

7.4.16

MONDAY MANTRA

Patience (again)

6.27.16

MONDAY MANTRA

Yes, I waited until some were ripe. I tasted them this morning while out walking the dog. Sweet and delicious!!!

Here is another example of my patience. For three years or more, this plant has tried to grow in the same spot in one of my flower beds. I don't know what it is. The first three years, I pulled it out when it was only about four leaves big. This year, I'm waiting for it to bloom or do whatever it is going to do. The leaves are a little furry and the insects and snails seem to leave it alone. Do you know what it is?

6.26.16

From Stashtea.com
DLB brought me some tea from Portland. It is delicious! 

Last night I had Portland Blend and this morning, I'm not sure of the name but it has a flowery bouquet and it is a white tea base. 

The D in DLB stands for DEAR, because she is!


Splendid Sampler #38 was designed by Pam Kitty Morning (Pam Viera-McGinnis) and is called Vintage Flower Basket. I thought I would be adding buttons to the centers of my flowers, but they looked better without any. Maybe some "perfect circles" will do the trick. I am still able to do these blocks from my scrap Civil War type fabrics, although it was difficult to find enough blue to go with the only color of ric-rac I had in my stash.

Block #39 is designed by Aylin Ozturk and is called Balls in the Air. She designed it to be a complex foundation paper piecing work made up of 64 pieces. I simplified my version to 5 pieces on a background.







The next Temecula Circa 2016 block marks the 24th episode in this mystery quilt. It is called Four Patch Pinwheel. I'm having trouble staying in the scrap bag of batiks and have had to dip into my stashed fabrics from time to time, but I am not making a dent on these fabrics in the least. Finished blocks are 3", so some of the things I'm cutting are only 1.25" squared.

6.25.16


Guess which meeting
this bottle of wine goes to?
This round of quilt guilds is as full of parties as the November/December meetings are. Last night, Pieceful Mountain Quilt Guild met early and went to a quilt show just up the street, then walked back to a special dinner meeting of salads and desserts. I try not to eat desserts, but Mrs. Wazoo's bar cookies let me ignore that. I took two home and enjoyed them so much.

Next week is Misty Mountain Quilt Guild's June Memorial Meeting. The spread will be sumptuous, since EVERYone is expected to bring something, and this guild is filled with southern cooks, church ladies, and military wives who ALL have a best dish. We will have a program that remembers the beginning of our group, and memorializes friends and family who have died in the past year.

Then, at Southern Appalachian Modern Quilt Guild, we are having Christmas in July. We are to bring a $20 gift, wrapped uniquely. I have to remember to bring tea, sweeteners, and lemons. 

I spent all Friday morning researching how to wrap a bottle of wine uniquely. I printed out a couple of patterns for wine carriers, but then I realized FUROSHIKI was the answer. After  a few youtube.com videos, I was ready to come up with a combo of techniques. Instead of the light weight Furoshiki fabric, I cut two pieces of quilters cotton, about 24" square and put wrong sides together to begin my wrapping. I tucked in raw edges wherever I could. 

This is the only Christmas fabric I had on hand, and since I am not buying anymore fabric, I had to cut it and free it to go live somewhere else. These are vintage pieces, 20 years older than the wine.




6.23.16

I am not a supplement taker. I know plenty of people that eat whole piles of pills every day mixing minerals, vitamins, and other who knows what. So much so, that I'm sure they have to skip meals because there is not room in their stomachs for food with all those food replacements and enhancers. 

But, I DO take Calm. I take it every night. It can range in price from about $12 to $24 a month. I used to get about three to four hours of sleep a night before coming fully awake and finding it difficult to go back to sleep. Now, mostly I sleep five hours and after waking, I can fall back asleep with minimal effort and sleep two more hours.

I can't easily find it locally--at least, I haven't asked my groc store pharmacy yet if they will order it in. I did pay DOUBLE the usual price at a teeny health food market inside a chiropractor's office (not my chiro) When I got home, I found my bag had my Calm, the organic lentils and organic black beans I purchased, and several religious tracts.  I decided to find a different source, so AMAZON to the rescue.


Except, I could not find exactly what I wanted at what I was willing to pay. I ended up with this, instead.

I'm not sure what the benefits are to having the mgs of the calcium BALANCE the mgs of magnesium, but it seems to work the same as far as my sleep pattern goes. With the other version, I get 80% of my MDR of magnesium, but only 20% of my calcium. I will have to go back to inputting my meals at Sparkpeople.com because they calculate all that and much much more at the bottom of the nutrition tracker page.

6.23.16

I am not a supplement taker. I know plenty of people that eat whole piles of pills every day mixing minerals, vitamins, and other who knows what. So much so, that I'm sure they have to skip meals because there is not room in their stomachs for food with all those food replacements and enhancers. 

But, I DO take Calm. I take it every night. It can range in price from about $12 to $24 a month. I used to get about three to four hours of sleep a night before coming fully awake and finding it difficult to go back to sleep. Now, mostly I sleep five hours and after waking, I can fall back asleep with minimal effort and sleep two more hours.

I can't easily find it locally--at least, I haven't asked my groc store pharmacy yet if they will order it in. I did pay DOUBLE the usual price at a teeny health food market inside a chiropractor's office (not my chiro) When I got home, I found my bag had my Calm, the organic lentils and organic black beans I purchased, and several religious tracts.  I decided to find a different source, so AMAZON to the rescue.


Except, I could not find exactly what I wanted at what I was willing to pay. I ended up with this, instead.

I'm not sure what the benefits are to having the mgs of the calcium BALANCE the mgs of magnesium, but it seems to work the same as far as my sleep pattern goes. With the other version, I get 80% of my MDR of magnesium, but only 20% of my calcium. I will have to go back to inputting my meals at Sparkpeople.com because they calculate all that and much much more at the bottom of the nutrition tracker page.

6.21.16

TEA TIME TUESDAY
I tried a new flavor for some iced "tea".  I like caffeine-free beverages after noon, and this looked like it might be good. So far, I've made it twice and can't seem to get a nice strong flavor. First, I tried it with four teabags in a half gallon, then six the second time. Next time, I'm using the remaining 10 bags.






I think it would be more flavorful if I added sugar, but that is not the point of drinking this. The point is to drink more fluids that DO NOT contain sugar. It's okay, but it's no Tazo Iced Passion.









I've been doing other things, besides making and drinking iced tea. 

I am working on a quilt top for the PULSE project, through Southern Appalachian Modern Quilt Guild. 

The Modern Quilt Guild of Orlando is spearheading the project. 

Those dark things on the left side blocks are safety pins. I use them to help me keep the rows in the right order. At this point, I've only sewn the top two rows together but you can get a pretty good idea of how its going to look.

I also made a pillow case that is long enough for my queen sized pillow. I've had the fabric for a couple of months, now, so it was time.